The limits of technique

I have just re-read (after a lapse of some years) Joseph Weizenbaum’s Computer Power and Human Reason, which first appeared in 1974. He addresses his polemic chiefly to computer scientists and computer-science teachers, but he is consciously aware that he is speaking more generally and philosophically. Some of what he says, it seems to me, applies to writers quite as well:

It happens that programming is a relatively easy craft to learn. Almost anyone with a reasonably orderly mind can become a fairly good programmer with just a little instruction and practice. And because programming is almost immediately rewarding, that is, because a computer very quickly begins to behave somewhat in the way the programmer intends it to, programming is very seductive, especially for beginners. Moreover, it appeals most to precisely those who do not yet have sufficient maturity to tolerate long delays between an effort to achieve something and the appearance of concrete evidence of success. Immature students are therefore easily misled into believing that they have truly mastered a craft of immense power and of great importance when, in fact, they have learned only its rudiments and nothing substantive at all.

A student’s quick climb from a state of complete ignorance about computers to what appears to be a mastery of programming, but is in reality only a very minor plateau, may leave him with a euphoric sense of achievement and a conviction that he has discovered his true calling.… He may so thoroughly commit himself to what he naively perceives to be computer science, that is, to the mere polishing of his programming skills, that he may effectively preclude studying anything substantive.

Unfortunately, many universities have ‘computer science’ programs at the undergraduate level that permit and even encourage students to take this course. When such students have completed their studies, they are rather like people who have somehow become eloquent in some foreign language, but who, when they attempt to write something in that language, find that they have literally nothing of their own to say.

The lesson in this is that, although the learning of a craft is important, it cannot be everything.

Replace ‘computer’ with ‘story’, ‘programming’ with ‘writing’, and so forth, and it stands as a pretty shrewd assessment of a rather common problem in recent fiction. On one level, you get the creative-writing graduate who has a superb grasp of technique, but does not know how to come up with an interesting story, and has been painstakingly taught not to care. On another, you get a certain kind of self-published writer – the one who thinks that volume is the sole and sufficient secret of success, and cranks out books as fast as he can shove them through the keyboard, without ever once asking, ‘Is this story interesting enough to be worth telling?’

Between these two, the world sees a lot of stories that might just as well not have been written at all. And yet the people who write them think they are accomplishing something, and in many cases, even feel that they have some kind of moral duty to persist and write their daily quota of pages. The idea of writing when one has something to say, it seems, scarcely occurs to them.

In the terms I used in ‘Style is the rocket’, these stories are all propulsion system and no payload. The rocket takes off with a satisfactory rush of smoke and flames, but at the end of its flight, nobody and nothing has been transported anywhere. This is a fine hobby for the rocketeer, but its entertainment value to anybody else, sad to say, is considerably lacking.

Comments

  1. Alice says:

    So true! I frequent one writing message board where so many people claim to write a novel every 6 months, or 3 months, or even every month, like they expect a legion of fans to sign up as if for the Jelly-of-the-Month Club, that it beggars belief (especially since those with the most outsize boasts tend to keep their names/pseudonyms and book titles to themselves). And woe betide anyone who expresses doubt in their ability to come up with that many distinctive stories, and present them at all well, without repeating themselves or falling into a formula.

    I’ve always felt I had plenty of stories to tell, but between life, depression, and ADD, it took me until well into adulthood to get serious about writing, and has taken almost 4 years since to work up to where 1,200 is a doable 5-days-a-week word count. With so many willing to scoff at that like it’s nothing, it’s a relief to see someone else saying what I often find myself thinking. Better to be remembered for a small list of excellent and varied books than have one’s vast catalog of formulaic, disposable books all forgotten in less time than it takes to digest a bag of Cheetos.

  2. “It happens that programming is a relatively easy craft to learn. Almost anyone with a reasonably orderly mind can become a fairly good programmer with just a little instruction and practice.”

    If this were the case, then it seems that not many people actually have a reasonably orderly mind, because not very many people can actually program (speaking as one myself).

    There is a lot of advice out there to “write every day”, etc. which may be a cause of the second sort of writer. The “write every day” folks don’t seem to give the other side of that advice (or at least not often enough), which is, “After you write, look at it and see if anyone else would read it.”

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